Texas Rangers: What I’ll Miss Most About Globe Life Park

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ARLINGTON, TX - APRIL 06: The Texas Rangers ground crew removes the tarp off the infield during a forty five minute rain delay before the game against the Toronto Blue Jays at Globe Life Park in Arlington on April 6, 2018 in Arlington, Texas. (Photo by Rick Yeatts/Getty Images)
ARLINGTON, TX - APRIL 06: The Texas Rangers ground crew removes the tarp off the infield during a forty five minute rain delay before the game against the Toronto Blue Jays at Globe Life Park in Arlington on April 6, 2018 in Arlington, Texas. (Photo by Rick Yeatts/Getty Images) /
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The Texas Rangers will play their final season in Globe Life Park next year. Here are some of the things about the stadium I’ll miss most.

While we’re all looking forward to Globe Life Field, there are going to be things we miss about Globe Life Park. So before I get excited about all the shiny new features at the new ballpark, I wanted to list what I’ll miss most from what will forever be The Ballpark in Arlington to me.

These features probably aren’t the most important thing in a baseball stadium. And there might be more aesthetically pleasing parks or better features in other stadiums, but the items on my list are what made the Rangers’ ballpark special to me.

The Red Brick Exterior

There’s just something about that red brick exterior. It catches your eye as you’re walking up to the ballpark, standing out against the rest of the buildings surrounding it. It’s classic ballpark architecture, yet it screams Texas. It’s perfect.

The Roofed Home Run Porch in Right Field

Globe Life Park
ARLINGTON, TX – AUGUST 31: The 2018 Ryder Cup Trophy Tour makes a stop at Globe Life Park in Arlington before the game between the Minnesota Twins and the Texas Rangers on August 31, 2018 in Arlington, Texas. (Photo by Richard Rodriguez/Getty Images) /

Yeah, it’s got some bad views. You don’t want to get stuck behind one of the steel columns holding up the upper deck. But it reminds me of old ballparks from the 1920’s and I love it. Honestly, I wouldn’t hate it if the entire outfield was a home run porch. I know that’s not feasible, but I just love the way it looks. Baseball is an old game, a game with history, and when the park you’re in reminds you of that history, there’s something comforting about that. Even if it comes with bad seats.

The White Steel Frieze

The offices beyond center field are adorned with a white steel frieze that’s reminiscent of old Yankee Stadium. To me, it’s one of the defining features of the ballpark, making it instantly recognizable. Like a lot of the features at Globe Life Park, it stirs nostalgia and makes you remember that baseball has been America’s game for a long time.

The Out-of-Town Scoreboard

Technically I already miss this. I hated when the Rangers changed the out-of-town scoreboard in left field from manual to electronic. I get that the manual is a chore to keep up with, but it’s old school and nostalgic and just really, really cool. I don’t know if this feature is moving to the new ballpark, or if it even fits with the new style, but I’d like to see the manual out-of-town scoreboard come back.

Greene’s Hill

There’s going to be a batter’s eye in the new ballpark. We know that. Batter’s eyes are necessary so that batters can see the ball coming out of the pitcher’s hand. But it doesn’t have to be a slight, sloping hill like Greene’s Hill. There’s no guarantee Rangers fans will have a neat little field to run onto so they can snag a home run ball. Greene’s Hill is a nice little touch at the ballpark, one of those details that you don’t notice until they’re gone. I’ll miss seeing kids spill onto the grass and race toward the latest home run hit by a Ranger.

Next. Could the Rangers reunite with Nelson Cruz?. dark

If you’re feeling nostalgic like me, leave a comment below about what you’ll miss the most about Globe Life Park.

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