Texas Rangers prospects: Breaking down the ‘Basher from the Bahamas’

NEW YORK, NY - JUNE 24: Texas Rangers batting helmets sit in their dugout before a game against the New York Yankees at Yankee Stadium on June 24, 2017 in the Bronx borough of New York City. The Rangers defeated the Yankees 8-1. (Photo by Rich Schultz/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY - JUNE 24: Texas Rangers batting helmets sit in their dugout before a game against the New York Yankees at Yankee Stadium on June 24, 2017 in the Bronx borough of New York City. The Rangers defeated the Yankees 8-1. (Photo by Rich Schultz/Getty Images) /
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The Texas Rangers system is loaded with talented middle infielders, but none with a better nickname than shortstop Keithron Moss.

When thinking about the greatest nicknames in baseball history, “Basher from the Bahamas” and “Bahama Breeze” are definitely atop that list.

Yes, “Bahama Breeze” could be the next best selling Gatorade flavor, but for the Texas Rangers, “Bahama Breeze” switch-hitting 19-year old second baseman.

Keithron Moss was born in New Providence, Bahamas and has been in the Rangers organization since 2017 after signing a minor league deal at the age of 16.

Moss isn’t a very big guy, standing at 5’11 and weighing in at 165, but he has plenty of time to fill out as he gets older.

The 19 year-old projects as a line-drive hitter that could possess gap power, and above average speed.

Different scouting reports say that Moss has excellent bat-to-ball skills, great barrel control and an advanced approach at the plate.

This Texas Rangers prospect got his nickname for a reason.

More importantly, Moss has a knack for getting on-base.

Over his two seasons in the minors, he has a collective .381 OBP with 56 walks over 85 games, demonstrating tremendous plate discipline.

He began his minor league career with the Dominican Summer League Rangers in 2018 and struggled during his first year in the professional ranks.

That season, Moss hit .196 with 11 doubles and 35 walks during his 51 games with the DSL Rangers, but would improve offensively during his second year.

In 2019, he moved up to the Arizona League team and saw major improvements in his all around game.

Over 34 games in Arizona, Moss hit .308 with an OBP of .425, not to mention he slugged .346.

His power numbers increased drastically, as well, adding four doubles, three triples and two homers to his statline, while also driving in 14.

His eye at the plate and ability to walk also further improved, reducing his strikeouts from 62 to 40 and walking 21 times in almost half the games.

Obviously, a pandemic ridden 2020 kept the minor league season from happening, but there is plenty of reason to believe that he would have kept progressing.

Having just turned 19 in August, there is plenty of time for growth and for the strikeouts to gradually tick downwards.

If he continues to impress and improve his patience, he will naturally get stronger and could be a force through the minor leagues.

Another appealing aspect to his game is his versatility.

Moss has played second, third and shortstop, but has also had some time in the outfield grass patrolling left field.

Keithron Moss still has a ways to go before cracking the big league roster, but could do so in the next five years.

I project Moss to begin the year with the AZL Rangers or extended Spring Training before making the jump to Low-A Down East.

If he progresses like he did between his first and second seasons, he could reach the Texas Rangers by 2026-2027.

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