Financial uncertainty casts a shadow over Texas Rangers' offseason

As the fans are still reveling over the World Series championship, the realities of the Texas Rangers financial situation are dampening the fans' enthusiasm for the 2024 season.

Texas Rangers Victory Parade
Texas Rangers Victory Parade / Sam Hodde/GettyImages
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November 1st will always be a happy day for the rest of my life. It was the day the Texas Rangers won their first World Series. It was a day of jubilation followed by a parade of joy. It was the culmination of 52 years in Arlington that finally paid off in a World Series championship. The calendar has now turned to December and pitchers and catchers will report in slightly less than 70 days from now. Texas is slowly putting together their roster for the 2024 season. They have made one major signing, agreeing to a contract with reliever Kirby Yates for one year and 4.5 million. That has been it so far as far as movement.

Texas instead of building onto their roster and solidifying their hold on the American League is taking a wait-and-see approach to free agency and trades. The New York Yankees have already traded for Juan Soto. The Toronto Blue Jays might be on the precipice of signing Shohei Ohtani. Texas meanwhile is sitting around waiting for the market to start moving.

Why is Texas not being more aggressive? Ken Rosenthal this morning on The Athletic laid out what he has heard Texas thinking is for this offseason. Texas according to sources is looking at two paths this winter. Texas is talking with Clayton Kershaw about staying home next season and pitching for Texas or looking at second-tier free-agent starters like Sean Manaea, Frankie Montas, or Michael Wacha. Rosenthal mentions that Texas is likely out on Jordan Montgomery due to "financial uncertainty" caused by the potential loss of the media rights deal with Bally Sports. I want to react to that supposed "financial uncertainty" and what it likely means for the construction of the 2024 roster.

Is Texas as poor as they are making it seem?