It’s time for the Texas Rangers to make Curtis Terry a big leaguer

Seth Carlson
SURPRISE, ARIZONA - MARCH 01: Infielder Terry Curtis #83 of the Texas Rangers runs to the dugout during the MLB spring training game against the San Francisco Giants on March 01, 2021 in Surprise, Arizona. (Photo by Christian Petersen/Getty Images)
SURPRISE, ARIZONA - MARCH 01: Infielder Terry Curtis #83 of the Texas Rangers runs to the dugout during the MLB spring training game against the San Francisco Giants on March 01, 2021 in Surprise, Arizona. (Photo by Christian Petersen/Getty Images) /
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When things are going south the way they have been for the Texas Rangers offense of late, many would agree that change is necessary, if not downright inevitable.

Why keep sending out the same group of players to hit on a nightly basis knowing that they’re an inconsistent bunch at best?

Something has to give, sure, but there’s a golden opportunity staring at the Rangers in plain sight, yet they don’t seem willing to give in: Calling up Curtis Terry.

Terry, 24-years-old, is lighting up AAA as a member of the Round Rock Express, with eight homers, 21 RBIs and a 1.028 OPS in 85 at-bats, to go along with his sterling .329 batting average and .382 on-base percentage.

Curtis Terry is dominating in the Texas Rangers’ farm system. It might be time to promote him.

He’s currently ranked as Texas’ 26th-best prospect according to MLB Pipeline after vaulting into the top-30 for the first time after a fantastic spring training that really turned heads within the organization.

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We profiled Terry last December, which you can read here.

The young southpaw slugger clearly has a bright future and a plus hitting tool. In tandem with the offense struggling so desperately, why not give him a shot?

And though the jump to the big leagues from AAA isn’t always smooth, Terry’s youth infusion and skillset can’t hurt this team any more than the woeful Khris Davis has in his brief, but so far unproductive tenure with the Texas Rangers.

The prospect first baseman has run out of things to prove in the minors. And unlike Cole Winn, a prized pitching prospect whom the Rangers must handle carefully, Terry is a big, bulky position player ready to demonstrate what he can do at the game’s highest level.

There’s no innings limit or pitch count on a power hitter like Terry. But there should be a limit on how long the Texas Rangers plan to stay mired in offensive futility, rebuild aside.

Next. Watch Dane Dunning achieve a major milestone. dark

Nothing’s guaranteed when it comes to promoting a prospect, but the big league club has little to lose on the field as it stands. Why not give Curtis Terry the promotion he so apparently deserves?

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